Vettel triumphs at an intense Hungarian Grand Prix under challenging conditions and it's a dominant one-two for Ferrari.

Ferrari managed to claim their first one-two victory in Hungary for thirteen years yesterday with their German driver Sebastien Vettel reigning victorious despite enduring extreme difficulties with his steering from the outset. From the moment his car left the grid with his usual blistering speed, the steering wheel of his Ferrari was crooked and pulling over to the the left hand side causing him to lose considerable pace and putting extreme pressure on his tyres. With sheer determination and grit along with the experience that comes with being a world class Formula One driver, Vettel managed to work his magic over the seventy laps and adapt quickly and with great finesse to the problems he was faced with, managing to avoid the kerbs at all times and to nurse his car around the precarious left-hand turns to limit exacerbating the difficulties. His team-mate Kimi Raikkonen had to settle for second place under team orders to remain where he was and act as a buffer between his leading team-mate and the ever-attacking Mercedes drivers even though the unhappy Finn had pleaded with his team that he could in fact go faster than Vettel. Punching the air with glee after his victory and celebrating with his mechanics, Vettel admitted it had been a tough race, "I'm over the moon because that was a really difficult race", he said. "I had my hands full from three or four laps after the Ricciardo safety car and something was wrong with the steering. It wasn't easy and I didn't have the pace to go faster. Towards the end it did come back a bit and I could breathe again but I had to stay focused for the whole race. It was really tough but a great race."

In qualifying, it was the four times world champion Vettel who stormed ahead to take pole position after a magnificent display of faultless driving whilst Hamilton had to settle for a disappointing start in fourth on the grid. Sweet revenge for the German after he endured a crippling puncture at the British Grand Prix two weeks ago with only one lap to go. Kimi Raikkonen accompanied his team-mate up the front in second and Valterri Bottas took third in his Mercedes car. Both of the McLaren drivers Fernando Alonso and Stoffel Vandoorne also managed to start in the top ten.

Lewis Hamilton of Mercedes who finished in fourth place in Budapest gained huge respect throughout the Formula One world by proving he is a team player and giving up his podium place to his team-mate Valterri Bottas. With all radio communication completely cut off for part of the race, Mercedes had no way of talking to their drivers. Until communication was resumed, Hamilton was forced to remain on the heels of Bottas until finally transmission returned and it was agreed that Bottas would move over for Hamilton on Lap 46 after struggling to overtake the two leading Ferrari's himself and to give his team-mate a shot. Lewis Hamilton promised over the radio to give the place back if he did not manage to take the lead and true to his word, then returned the favour on the final corner despite having gained an advantage of seven seconds and risking being overtaken by Max Verstappen at the final hurdle. The Hungaroring is a notoriously difficult circuit for overtaking and it was always looking highly likely that he would be unable to pass the Ferrari cars. "I am a man of my word", said Hamilton after the race. "I would rather win the championship the right way. I don't know if that will come back to bite me on the backside or not". An undeniably generous sporting gesture on Hamilton's behalf but with three title points lost, the question hangs in the air that this risky move could have possibly cost him the championship. Indeed, Sir Stirling Moss famously lost out on a world title not once but twice in 1956 and again in 1958 by three points or less. When questioned about the team's strategy, Mercedes team boss Toto Wolff said "It cost us three points and it could potentially cost the championship and we are perfectly conscious about that". He went on to say that it was the most difficult call his team have had to make in the past five years but that he would stand by the decision and by the team's values.

It was a very disappointing day for the Red Bull team when both of their drivers collided in the very early stages of the race at Turn Two whilst jostling for position. The Australian driver Daniel Ricciardo overtook his Dutch team-mate Max Verstappen on the approach to Turn Two as the Dutchman was forced out wide by Bottas in his Mercedes. With Ricciardo clearly ahead and on target for a successful drive, Max Verstappen, renowned for being a hot-headed teenager and perhaps riled that his team-mate had passed him, locked his brakes too late and smashed into his Australian team-mate and broke his radiator on impact. The smile we have become so accustomed to seeing was wiped off Ricciardo's face as the safety car was brought out and he faced the long walk of shame back to the pits. An incensed Daniel made no bones when interviewed afterwards about who was to blame and the stewards echoed his sentiments when Max was punished with a ten second penalty. Christian Horner, Team Principal at Red Bull explained his utter dismay post race when he said "What you never want to see is team-mates touch. Max is aggressive, he is on the limit. He made a mistake today and it was costly for him , for Daniel and for the team." He went on to explain that, frustratingly, the team had discussed the chances of such an event occurring before the race when he said, "In the pre-race meeting we talked about the golden rule - 'give each other space on Turn One and Turn Two, has everybody got that?' They gave us the nod and then that happened at Turn Two". No doubt there will be many discussions taking place at Red Bull today and in the coming weeks about the events that took place in Hungary and how their two top drivers can eradicate any bad feeling and fix their working relationship to focus on the remaining races ahead.

Also knocked out of the race were the Haas driver Romain Grosjean, Nico Hulkenberg of Renault Sport and the Scotsman Paul Di Resta. Standing in for the Williams driver Felipe Massa at only ninety minutes notice before Saturday's practise session, the Williams reserve driver Di Resta was called upon after Massa had fallen unwell on Friday night and was taken to hospital after complaining of dizzy spells. He was given the all clear by the FIA to participate in Sunday's race but was unfortunately still suffering on Saturday. Di Resta only managed nineteenth place in qualifying and with not much experience to date and with yesterday being his first race in Formula One for almost four years, it was undoubtedly a gallant effort despite being forced to retire with only eight laps to the finish line with an oil leak.

The fastest lap of the day went to the Spaniard Fernando Alonso who smashed the record in his McLaren Honda proving that he and his British team could be potential contenders if they can sort out their ongoing engine problems that have blighted their progress during the season so far. "Sixth was the best result possible today. Fastest lap is a gift and we will take it" the two-time world champion declared after the race. Alonso was granted his moment in the spotlight yesterday when he re-enacted his famous deckchair moment from the Brazilian Grand Prix where he had lounged in a deckchair alongside the track after his car had suffered mechanical issues in a practise session. Continuing the theme, Alonso stole some of the limelight from the podium celebration and could be seen sitting in a deckchair right next to an image of himself doing the exact same thing that had been expertly painted on to the pit lane to symbolize the start of the F1 summer break.

The fastest lap of the day went to the Spaniard Fernando Alonso who smashed the record in his McLaren Honda proving that he and his British team could be potential contenders if they can sort out their ongoing engine problems that have blighted their progress during the season so far. "Sixth was the best result possible today. Fastest lap is a gift and we will take it" the two-time world champion declared after the race. Alonso was granted his moment in the spotlight yesterday when he re-enacted his famous deckchair moment from the Brazilian Grand Prix where he had lounged in a deckchair alongside the track after his car had suffered mechanical issues in a practise session. Continuing the theme, Alonso stole some of the limelight from the podium celebration and could be seen sitting in a deckchair right next to an image of himself doing the exact same thing that had been expertly painted on to the pit lane to symbolize the start of the F1 summer break.